Special session may see marijuana reform in Minnesota

| Jul 1, 2021 | Drug Charges |

Cannabis is in every state’s legislation these days, whether to reconsider current laws or fully legalize use of the drug. Many proponents of reform believe the penalties these days represent an unequal injustice when it comes to crime and punishment.

Marijuana Moment reports how, despite a House bill dying in the last session, a special session may represent a turning point in decriminalization.

Potential changes in the law

Advocates say they seek to reduce the inequity of criminal charges in regards to cannabis and cannabis products. Many claim that these charges disproportionately target minority communities. Others argue that a felony charge and the loss of the right to own guns seems steep for possessing two THC gummy bears.

That is why the legislation looks to reform the laws by reducing penalties for simple possession. It would also allow people with drug charges of possession up to eight grams of cannabis to appeal for an expungement of their record.

Current details of the law

Whether or not these attempts at reform succeed, it is important for anyone to keep up on the everchanging state of marijuana laws. Minnesota’s current stance involves legal marijuana for medical cardholders and misdemeanor penalties for possession of 42.5 grams or less.

Possession of more than 42.5 grams involves felony charges and penalties of up to five years in prison and $10,000 in fines.

Felonies have a substantial impact on anyone’s life, but misdemeanors may still disrupt opportunities like college or scholarships. Losing thousands of dollars in scholarships or grants is much like those fines. Knowing what to expect and what is at stake may help prepare anyone facing these charges prepare a defense against them.